cerhu > comp.os.* > comp.os.mac-os.x

justaguy (25/11/2011, 23h47)
Hi,

I have just one more question about Mac and database... other than
FileMaker (Pro) is there any other database that I could freely bundle
with my software package? It appears mySQL (now under Oracle) is no
longer open source...

Thanks.
Matt (25/11/2011, 23h59)
On Ven 25 novembre 2011, 22:47,
justaguy <donli> wrote:

> Hi,


Hello,

> I have just one more question about Mac and database... other than
> FileMaker (Pro) is there any other database that I could freely bundle
> with my software package? It appears mySQL (now under Oracle) is no
> longer open source...


Il y a d'autres solutions comme PostgreSQL par exemple, que sa licence
permet entre autres ?uf Corse, sa redistribution.

Regarde par là l'Anglois :
<http://www.postgresql.org/about/>

> Thanks.


Je t'en prie mais il serait bien que tu blablates en français car ce
groupe est _francophone_ my dear.
justaguy (26/11/2011, 01h42)
On Nov 25, 4:59 pm, Matt <hfr...@syrius.org.invalid> wrote:
[..]
> Regarde par là l'Anglois :
> <http://www.postgresql.org/about/>
>> Je t'en prie mais il serait bien que tu blablates en français car ce

> groupe est _francophone_ my dear.
> --
> echo 'hfr...@flevhf.bet' | \
> tr '[a-z]' '[n-za-m]'


Thanks Matt, yes, it appears that PostgreSQL is a desirable option
now, not sure about how easy or difficult it is to install and
configure and run on various Mac OS X computers...

Btw, is it able to import / migrate an Access db?

Best,

Don
Matt (26/11/2011, 02h54)
On Sam 26 novembre 2011, 00:42,
justaguy <donli> wrote:

> Thanks Matt, yes, it appears that PostgreSQL is a desirable option
> now, not sure about how easy or difficult it is to install and
> configure and run on various Mac OS X computers...


I can't tell you such a thing (i'm using a postgresql packaged by an
accounting software) but after a quick look on the postgresql website
there's a Mac OS X installer there[1] which would be simpler than
compiling the sources if you're not familiar with the Xcode/devtools
thingies.

> Btw, is it able to import / migrate an Access db?


According to Postgresql's wiki there are some solutions[2].

> Best,


[1] <http://www.postgresql.org/download/macosx>
[2] <http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Converting_from_other_Databases_to_PostgreSQL>

PS. i'm crossposting to comp.databases.postgresql and
comp.sys.mac.system and set the followup to comp.databases.postgresql
as those are english spoken newsgroups and your question is more
postgresql related.

PPS. grab a *real* newsreader for Usenet; Google's interface really
s*cks
Only Nixon could go to China Blue (26/11/2011, 03h10)
Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX. It's also available through CoreData.
justaguy (26/11/2011, 05h05)
On Nov 25, 8:10 pm, Only Nixon could go to China Blue
<chineb> wrote:
> Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX. It's also available through CoreData.
> --
> White folks think they're at the top,  |        Ha, ha, that isvery logical.
> ask any proud white male.              |       I'm whoever you want me to be.
> A million years of evolution,          |  Annoying Usenet onepost at a time.
> and we get Danny Quayle.               |    At least I can stay in character.


"Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX", does that mean 90% of all Mac
computers (be it laptop or notebook, sold 5 years ago something)?

Many thanks.
Michael Vilain (26/11/2011, 05h14)
In article
<7b338f95-412c-4364-ab99-f313e7a7a97d>,
justaguy <donli> wrote:

> On Nov 25, 8:10 pm, Only Nixon could go to China Blue
> <chineb> wrote:
> "Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX", does that mean 90% of all Mac
> computers (be it laptop or notebook, sold 5 years ago something)?
> Many thanks.


Yes.
JF Mezei (26/11/2011, 05h42)
> "Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX", does that mean 90% of all Mac
> computers (be it laptop or notebook, sold 5 years ago something)?


MySQL is pre-installed on OS_X servers (at least up to Snow Leopard). It
was not installed in OS)X, but you can download and install it easily.

SQLlite may be part of OS-X, but I am not sure if there is easy access
to it.
justaguy (26/11/2011, 06h36)
On Nov 25, 10:42 pm, JF Mezei <jfmezeispam> wrote:
> > "Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX", does that mean 90% of all Mac
> > computers (be it laptop or notebook, sold 5 years ago something)?

> MySQL is pre-installed on OS_X servers (at least up to Snow Leopard). It
> was not installed in OS)X, but you can download and install it easily.
> SQLlite may be part of OS-X, but I am not sure if there is easy access
> to it.


"SQLlite may be part of OS-X, but I am not sure if there is easy
access
to it. ", interesting point, and that's what I was researching an hour
ago, and I seem to draw same conclusion. funny tho how come such an
impressive corporation like Apple wouldn't think of providing an easy
access tool for a useful "platform" if we may call it so?

Thanks.
justaguy (26/11/2011, 06h39)
On Nov 25, 10:14 pm, Michael Vilain <vil> wrote:
[..]
>  justaguy <do> wrote:
> Yes.
> --
> DeeDee, don't press that button!  DeeDee!  NO!  Dee...
> [I filter all Goggle Groups posts, so any reply may be automatically ignored]


Thanks. And per JF Mezei, now a question is how to get my Access
database into it and be able to use it (data update and retrieval)...
David Empson (26/11/2011, 07h45)
justaguy <donli> wrote:

> On Nov 25, 8:10 pm, Only Nixon could go to China Blue
> <chineb> wrote:
> > Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX. It's also available through CoreData.

> "Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX", does that mean 90% of all Mac
> computers (be it laptop or notebook, sold 5 years ago something)?


sqlite3 comes preinstalled (as a library and command line tool) at least
on Mac OS X 10.5 and 10.6, so it is on all Macs sold since about October
2007, and older ones (dating back at least to 2004 and for some models
back to 2001) which have upgraded to 10.5.

Whether it is useful for you is a more difficult question to answer. I
haven't seen the thread far enough back to know what you need in a
database (apart from "free"), and that you want to convert data from
Access.

SQLite is basically a library which allows applications to incorporate a
single user SQL database without having to go to the trouble of
implementing it themselves. There is also a command line tool which can
be used to perform actions on database files created by SQLite.

If you are writing an application, you don't need SQLite to be included
with the operating system, because you can download the source code and
build it yourself, linking it directly into your application. (The OS
library just provides a convenient option, which is used by many parts
of Mac OS X, so it avoids the need for multiple copies of SQLite to be
included with the system.)

If you want to get data from Access to anything else, you would probably
need to export the data from Access into a standard file format like
CSV, then import it into the other database.

From a quick glance, the sqlite3 command line tool cannot directly
import CSV files, but it can import text files which have no value
quotations or character esacpes, e.g. a TAB-delimited text file might be
OK (as long as TAB doesn't appear anywhere in the data).

If sqlite3 can't import the data directly then you would need a third
party utility or write your own application or script to preprocess the
data and turn it into something like SQL INSERT statements or a suitably
formatted text file which can be imported.
Only Nixon could go to China Blue (26/11/2011, 08h26)
In article <7b338f95-412c-4364-ab99-f313e7a7a97d>,
justaguy <donli> wrote:

> On Nov 25, 8:10 pm, Only Nixon could go to China Blue
> <chineb> wrote:
> "Sqlite is preinstalled on MacOSX", does that mean 90% of all Mac
> computers (be it laptop or notebook, sold 5 years ago something)?
> Many thanks.


Every Mac with MacOSX will have it. System 9 and earlier will not have it.
Only Nixon could go to China Blue (26/11/2011, 08h36)
In article <d13f7ac8-76f5-4346-947f-daf00a2866a9>,
justaguy <donli> wrote:

> On Nov 25, 10:42 pm, JF Mezei <jfmezeispam> wrote:
> "SQLlite may be part of OS-X, but I am not sure if there is easy
> access
> to it. ", interesting point, and that's what I was researching an hour
> ago, and I seem to draw same conclusion. funny tho how come such an
> impressive corporation like Apple wouldn't think of providing an easy
> access tool for a useful "platform" if we may call it so?


The command line is sqlite3, with man page 'man sqlite3'. The library interface
is <sqlite3.h> which also documents the interface. It is also the SQL that
CoreData can use. Also [..]
justaguy (26/11/2011, 16h47)
On Nov 26, 12:45 am, demp...@actrix.gen.nz (David Empson) wrote:
[..]
> OK (as long as TAB doesn't appear anywhere in the data).
> If sqlite3 can't import the data directly then you would need a third
> party utility or write your own application or script to preprocess the
> data and turn it into something like SQL INSERT statements or a suitably
> formatted text file which can be imported.
> --
> David Empson
> demp...@actrix.gen.nz


"
SQLite is basically a library which allows applications to incorporate
a
single user SQL database without having to go to the trouble of
implementing it themselves. There is also a command line tool which
can
be used to perform actions on database files created by SQLite.
"
among others, thank you.

Here's the reason for the discussion:
An app has already been designed and developed and in the market for
Windows users and I initially designed it about three years ago I used
MS SQL Server Express as the back-end data storage vehicle... but the
"Express" installation wasn't reliable enough, hence, I switched to
Access and considering less than 1/3 of market share for the personal
computing at that time for Mac, I decided to go with Windows first...
and here's the app's website if interested in further info about it,
[..]

Now back to this question about SQLite, it seems its designer's
thought is to support new app development with it, but for case like
us... it sounds like hassle because it is not able to easily import/
migrate one database and allows standard SQL call for data
manipulation it would work for our need.
Michael Vilain (26/11/2011, 17h18)
In article
<d13f7ac8-76f5-4346-947f-daf00a2866a9>,
justaguy <donli> wrote:

> On Nov 25, 10:42 pm, JF Mezei <jfmezeispam> wrote:
> "SQLlite may be part of OS-X, but I am not sure if there is easy
> access
> to it. ", interesting point, and that's what I was researching an hour
> ago, and I seem to draw same conclusion. funny tho how come such an
> impressive corporation like Apple wouldn't think of providing an easy
> access tool for a useful "platform" if we may call it so?
> Thanks.


SQLite is a 'backend' and would be of little use for customers.
/usr/lib/libsqlite3.0.dylib is part of MacOS X, so the API is available
for programs that call it. Most programs that need some sort of
smallish table-based database use it. For example, Unison uses it to
keep the newgroups on each server it stores. It's 'good enough' and
unencumbered by any licensing ([..]).
There are lots of GUI front-ends for it. Find one you like, free or
shareware, to use. But once you've setup your database, there's no need
to copy the development tool to the installed system. sqlite3 is part
of MacOS X.

One thing I've noticed about younger developers is this huge sense of
'software entitlement' when vendors are concerned. You don't want to
pay for something and expect a vendor to pick up the tab.

I think the 'customer experience' of a Macintosh includes the tools to
make that experience as easy as possible. MySQL isn't really a part of
that. Most customers buy a GUI front-end database if they need one. If
you want MySQL on your system, install it. If it's for commercial use,
pay the price as a cost of doing business.

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